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Agronomy/Food Science



Results 21 - 28 of 28.


Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 15.02.2012
Owning a dog encourages exercise in pregnant women
Owning a dog encourages exercise in pregnant women
A study of more than 11,000 pregnant women in Children of the 90s at the University of Bristol shows that those who owned dogs were approximately 50 per cent more likely than those who didn't to achieve the recommended 30 minutes of exercise a day through high levels of brisk walking. Scientists suggest that, as walking is a low-risk exercise, walking a dog could form part of a broader strategy to improve the health of pregnant women.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.02.2012
Sri Lanka diabetes warning
Sri Lanka diabetes warning
Scientists at King's College London and the National Diabetes Centre (Sri Lanka) have found evidence of a high number of risk factors for type 2 diabetes among the young urban population in Sri Lanka. The study is the first large-scale investigation into diabetes risk among children and young people in South Asia, and provides further evidence that the region is rapidly becoming a hotspot in the growing international diabetes epidemic.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 07.02.2012
Baby-led weaning promotes healthy food preferences
A new study by psychologists at The University of Nottingham has shown that babies who are weaned using solid finger food are more likely to develop healthier food preferences and are less likely to become overweight as children than those who are spoon-fed pureed food. The research just published by BMJ Open set out to examine the impact of weaning style on food preferences and Body Mass Index in early childhood in a sample of 155 children.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 26.01.2012
Heart attack deaths have halved
The death rate from heart attacks in England has halved in the last decade, according to Oxford University research. The study published in the British Medical Journal found that there were fewer heart attacks in the last decade - and fewer of these were fatal - compared with earlier years. 'These are big success stories for public health and for the NHS,' says Kate Smolina, first author on the study.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 23.01.2012
Straight from the horse’s mouth -- study reveals owners supplement choices
PA 22/12 Horse owners are most likely to use their vet to guide the choice of nutritional supplements they feed their animal, but also rely heavily on recommendations from other riders, a unique study has revealed. Early findings from the research, being led by the School of Veterinary Sciences at The University of Nottingham, also found that joint and mobility and behaviour problems topped the list of owners concerns when seeking supplements for their horse.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.01.2012
Tuna-eating teenagers less likely to suffer depression
Tuna-eating teenagers less likely to suffer depression
New research from the Children of the 90s study at the University of Bristol, which has been charting the health of 14,500 children since their birth in the early 1990s, shows that the link between low levels of vitamin D and depression is established in childhood and that ensuring children have a good intake of vitamin D could help reduce depression in adolescence and adulthood.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.01.2012
Maize gene could lead to bumper harvest
Maize gene could lead to bumper harvest
The discovery of a new 'provisioning' gene in maize plants that regulates the transfer of nutrients from the plant to the seed could lead to increased crop yields and improve food security. Scientists from Oxford University and the University of Warwick, in collaboration with agricultural biotech research company Biogemma-Limagrain, have identified the gene, called Meg 1.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 13.01.2012
Discovery of plant ‘nourishing gene’ brings hope for increased crop seed yield and food security
University of Warwick scientists have discovered a "nourishing gene" which controls the transfer of nutrients from plant to seed - a significant step which could help increase global food production. The research, led by the University of Warwick in collaboration with the University of Oxford and agricultural biotech research company Biogemma, has identified for the first time a gene, named Meg1, which regulates the optimum amount of nutrients flowing from mother to offspring in maize plants.