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Life Sciences - Health - 28.12.2010
Left wing or right wing It's written in the brain
Left wing or right wing It’s written in the brain
If you listen to Radio 4's Today Programme on any given day, you'll inevitably hear a spectrum of politic views from socialist through liberal to conservative. You may find yourself agreeing with the interviewee or irked by their politics depending on your own political persuasion. Liberals and conservatives may find themselves disagreeing on issues as wide-ranging as the future of the NHS, the UK's involvement in Afghanistan and whether students should pay tuition fees at university, but could these differences be a result of different brain structures?

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2010
Primary school children authors on science paper
Primary school children authors on science paper
A group of UK primary school children have achieved a world first by having their school science project accepted for publication in an internationally recognised peer-reviewed Royal Society journal. The paper, which reports novel findings in how bumblebees perceive colour, is published in Biology Letters today.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.12.2010
Alzheimer's changes detectable in healthy elderly
Alzheimer’s changes detectable in healthy elderly
A team of UCL researchers, part-funded by the Alzheimer's Research Trust, has discovered that combining spinal fluid testing with MRI scans could provide an early indication of a person's risk of developing Alzheimer?s. The approach could allow scientists to test treatments or preventions far earlier in the disease, when experts believe they could be more effective.

Life Sciences - 21.12.2010
Autistic children’s exceptional visual search skills may not translate into everyday life
University of Nottingham News Press releases 2010 December Autistic children's exceptional visual search skills may not translate into everyday life PA 363/10 It is well established in scientific studies that children with autism repeatedly outperform typically-developing children on a range of visual search skills.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2010
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome not caused by XMRV
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome not caused by XMRV
Links: Wellcome Trust Professor Greg Towers Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute A virus previously thought to be associated with chronic fatigue syndrome is not the cause of the disease, a detailed study led by UCL scientists has shown. The research shows that cell samples used in previous research were contaminated with the virus identified as XMRV and that XMRV is present in the mouse genome.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.12.2010
Food in early life affects fertility
Study finds food in early life affects fertility The reproductive success of men and women is influenced by the food they receive at an early stage in life, according to new research by the University of Sheffield. The research, which was published online this month (17 December 2010) in the journal Ecology, is the first study of its kind to show that early life food can have a serious influence on the life-long fertility of individuals.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 16.12.2010
FReD helps explain how a bee sees
FReD helps explain how a bee sees
FReD helps explain how a bee sees Researchers have developed a database that shows how colours appear to bees - News Adapted from a news release issued by Queen Mary, University of London Thursday 16 December 2010 Bees can see colours but they perceive the world differently to us, including variations in hue that we cannot distinguish with the naked eye.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
Scientists identify how virus triggers cervical and mouth cancer
Scientists identify how virus triggers cervical and mouth cancer
University of Manchester scientists have discovered for the first time an important new way in which the human papilloma virus (HPV) triggers cancer in what could lead to new treatments for cervical and mouth cancer. HPV infection is known to increase the risk of developing cancers of the cervix and mouth with the two high-risk forms of the virus accounting for approximately 70% of all cervical cancer cases.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.12.2010
University scientists expose health risks of not responding to stress
Anticipating a hectic Christmas? As the festive season gathers momentum, ageing and immunity experts at the University of Birmingham are exposing the health risks of not responding to stressful situations. Their latest research has found that people who react the least to stress could be at greater risk of conditions such as depression and obesity, and have lowered immunity to infection.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2010
Fighter pilots' brains are more sensitive?
Fighter pilots’ brains are more sensitive?
Links: Journal of Neuroscience MRC Wellcome Trust Professor Masud Husain Cognitive tests and MRI scans have shown significant differences in the brains of fighter pilots when compared to a control group, according to a new study led by scientists from UCL. The study, published today in the Journal of Neuroscience , compares the cognitive performance of 11 front-line RAF (Royal Air Force) Tornado fighter pilots to a control group of a similar IQ with no previous experience of piloting aircraft.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2010
Leukaemia stem cell discovery
Leukaemia stem cell discovery
Researchers at King's College London have discovered that leukaemic stem cells can be reversed to a pre-leukaemic stage by suppressing a protein called beta-catenin found in the blood. They also found that advanced leukaemic stem cells that had become resistant to treatment could be 're-sensitised' to treatment by suppressing the same protein.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2010
Two genes linked to common gynaecological disease
Two genes linked to common gynaecological disease
Science | Health 13 Dec 10 Two genetic variants have been identified that increase the risk of developing endometriosis, a common gynaecological disease. The study provides clues to the origin of this often very painful condition, which has a significant impact on the quality of life of many women. The research was carried out at the University of Oxford, the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Australia, and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in the USA.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 10.12.2010
Scientists give insight into 200-year-old riddle
Scientists give insight into 200-year-old riddle
University of Manchester researchers have played a vital role in an international study that has revived the 200-year-old question: why do different species share similar stages of embryonic development? Dr Casey Bergman and Dr Dave Gerrard at Manchester's Faculty of Life Sciences collaborated on the project with Pavel Tomancak, at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden, and Uwe Ohler, at Duke University, on a study funded by the Human Frontiers of Science Program published in Nature today.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.12.2010
Scientists discover brain's inherent ability to focus learning
Scientists discover brain’s inherent ability to focus learning
Medical researchers have found a missing link that explains the interaction between brain state and the neural triggers responsible for learning, potentially opening up new ways of boosting cognitive function in the face of diseases such as Alzheimer's as well as enhancing memory in healthy people. Much is known about the neural processes that occur during learning but until now it has not been clear why it occurs during certain brain states but not others.

Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
University research aims to solve major questions in reproductive biology
University research aims to solve major questions in reproductive biology
University research aims to solve major questions in reproductive biology An expert at the University of Sheffield is set to investigate whether all sperm males produce are equally likely to fertilise, as part of a 1.7million research project that could lead to improvements in assisted reproductive technology in humans.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
See off Alzheimer's with the colour purple
See off Alzheimer’s with the colour purple
Eating purple fruits such as blueberries and drinking green tea can help ward off diseases including Alzheimer's, Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson's, a University of Manchester report claims. Ground-breaking research from Professor Douglas Kell, published in the journal Archives of Toxicology, has found that the majority of debilitating illnesses are in part caused by poorly-bound iron which causes the production of dangerous toxins that can react with the components of living systems.

Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
Scientists discover new way of seeing
University of Manchester scientists have found that a new type of light sensitive cell in the eye helps the brain measure brightness. This mechanism, which works alongside the rod and cone cells in the eyes, may be particularly important to people with some sorts of blindness. Professor Rob Lucas and Dr Tim Brown, whose work is oublished in PLoS Biology today, hope their findings will lead to a new understanding of how we perceive the world, and may eventually even lead to technical applications in artificial lighting, visual display unit and television screen design.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.12.2010
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children
Secondhand smoke increases risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to get invasive meningococcal disease than children who are not exposed, according to a metaanalysis published in PLoS Medicine - News Tuesday 7 December 2010 Children exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to get invasive meningococcal disease than children who are not exposed, according to a metaanalysis published today in the journal PLoS Medicine.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.12.2010
Forget your previous conceptions about memory
Forget your previous conceptions about memory
Research may shed light on why dementia sufferers have memory difficulties. Memory difficulties such as those seen in dementia may arise because the brain forms incomplete memories that are more easily confused, new research from the University of Cambridge has found. The findings are published today .

Health - Life Sciences - 06.12.2010
Scientists shed light on blood flow problems in dementia
Scientists shed light on blood flow problems in dementia
Press release issued 6 December 2010 Scientists in Bristol have uncovered some of the processes responsible for the blood flow problems connected with Alzheimer's disease. Their findings could see existing drugs used for leaky blood vessels trialled as potential Alzheimer's treatments. Researchers at the University of Bristol's Dementia Research Group supported by the Alzheimer's Research Trust , the UK's leading dementia research charity, investigated problems with the function of blood vessels in the brains of people with Alzheimer's ' a known feature of the disease.
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