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Results 61 - 80 of 606.


Life Sciences - Mathematics - 26.11.2010
How the stingray got its spots
Science Pete Wilton | 26 Nov 10 Patterns are everywhere in the animal kingdom but understanding the mechanisms that produce them is a real challenge. In this week's Physical Review E Thomas Woolley and Ruth Baker of Oxford University's Mathematical Institute report on mathematical simulations that may explain how stingrays generate their distinctive spots.

Physics - Chemistry - 26.11.2010
Cassini reveals oxygen atmosphere of Saturn's moon Rhea
Cassini reveals oxygen atmosphere of Saturn’s moon Rhea
A fragile atmosphere infused with oxygen and carbon-dioxide has been discovered at Saturn's moon Rhea by the Cassini-Huygens mission - the first time a spacecraft has captured direct evidence of an oxygen atmosphere at a world other than Earth. The NASA-led international mission made the discovery using combined data from Cassini's instruments, which includes a sensor designed and built at UCL's (University College London) Mullard Space Science Laboratory.

Life Sciences - 26.11.2010
Where are all the flowers from?
Where are all the flowers from?
Amborella trichopoda , the world's most ancient flowering plant, bloomed at the University's Botanic Garden this autumn. The Garden's Director, Professor Simon Hiscock, believes this unusual specimen may hold the key to unravelling Darwin's 'abominable mystery' - the evolutionary origin of flowering plants.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.11.2010
Identifying Eadgyth
Identifying Eadgyth
When German archaeologists discovered bones in the tomb of Queen Eadgyth in Magdeburg Cathedral, they looked to Bristol to provide the crucial scientific evidence that the remains were indeed those of the English royal. Dr Alistair Pike in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology tells Hannah Johnson how tiny samples of tooth enamel proved the identity of a Saxon queen.

Economics - 24.11.2010
Stroke survivors survey published
A study led by King's College London, commissioned by The Stroke Association, reveals for the first time the extent of the financial impact of having a stroke, making stroke survivors amongst the most vulnerable in society. The UK Stroke Survivor Needs Survey, carried out by the Division of Health and Social Care Research at King's, shows that more than half of the people employed at the time of their stroke (52 per cent) said it had a negative impact on their work, meaning they had to reduce their hours or give up work entirely.

Economics - Law - 23.11.2010
Tobacco: Out of sight, out of mind?
PA 323/10 Putting tobacco out of sight in shops can change the attitude of young people to smoking, while not hitting retailers in the pocket, researchers at The University of Nottingham have discovered. Academics from the University's UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies looked at the effect of the removal of tobacco displays in the Republic of Ireland, ahead of similar legislation which is due to come into force in the UK.

Chemistry - Physics - 23.11.2010
World first to provide building blocks for new nano devices
PA 322/10 Scientists at The University of Nottingham have made a major breakthrough that could help shape the future of nanotechnology, by demonstrating for the first time that 3-D molecular structures can be built on a surface. The discovery could prove a significant step forward towards the development of new nano devices such as cutting-edge optical and electronic technologies and even molecular computers.

Health - Administration - 22.11.2010
Cholesterol drug shows benefits for kidney patients
Cholesterol drug shows benefits for kidney patients
A combination drug that lowers levels of 'bad' cholesterol in the blood can benefit people with chronic kidney disease and is safe, a study led by the Clinical Trial Service Unit at Oxford University has found. Patients receiving the daily pill - a combination of simvastatin and ezetimibe produced by Merck - had one-sixth fewer heart attacks, strokes or operations to unblock arteries than those receiving a placebo 'dummy' pill.

Economics - 22.11.2010
Delphi: The bellybutton of the ancient world
Delphi: The bellybutton of the ancient world
Look beyond simply the famed oracular priestess breathing in hallucinogenic gases and you find a place whose past speaks directly to the 21st century. That is the argument of Cambridge University's Dr Michael Scott who is researching how and why Delphi, a small Greek town and religious sanctuary perched on a difficult to reach mountainside, was for 1,000 years the proclaimed 'omphalos', the 'bellybutton', the very centre of the ancient world.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.11.2010
Chromosome key to later fertility
Chromosome key to later fertility
Science | Health Cath Harris | 19 Nov 10 New research at Oxford University has shed light on how mammalian egg cells divide. The findings may lead to improvements in women's chances of giving birth to healthy babies as they get older. After the age of 33, the likelihood of a woman producing healthy eggs and embryos declines dramatically but little is known of the reasons why.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 19.11.2010
Researchers uncover surprise link between weird quantum phenomena
Researchers uncover surprise link between weird quantum phenomena
Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle sets limits on Einstein's "spooky action at a distance", new research finds. Researchers have uncovered a fundamental link between the two defining properties of quantum physics. Jonathan Oppenheim, a physicist at the Department of Applied Mathematics & Theoretical Physics and a Fellow of Wolfson, and Stephanie Wehner of Singapore's Centre for Quantum Technologies and the National University of Singapore published their work today in the latest edition of the journal Science.

Life Sciences - 19.11.2010
All viruses can be DNA stowaways?
All viruses can be DNA stowaways?
Science | Health 19 Nov 10 'Fossil viruses' preserved inside the DNA of mammals and insects suggest that all viruses, including relatives of HIV and Ebola, could potentially be 'stowaways' transmitted from generation to generation for millions of years, according to new research. A team from Oxford University and the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center built on earlier work at Oxford that discovered the fossilised remains of an ancient HIV-like virus in the genomes of animals including sloths, lemurs and rabbits.

Health - 18.11.2010
Major international study to test new heart disease drug
Major international study to test new heart disease drug
A major international study to test whether a new type of cholesterol treatment can prevent coronary deaths and heart attacks will start in early 2011, it has been announced. The study will be coordinated by the Clinical Trial Service Unit (CTSU) at Oxford University. The REVEAL trial will investigate whether a drug called anacetrapib can drive down the risks of coronary deaths, heart attacks and other vascular complications.

Environment - Life Sciences - 18.11.2010
Squid: lessons from the deep
Squid: lessons from the deep
Science | Environment Pete Wilton | 18 Nov 10 A recent expedition to the Indian Ocean returned with a new species of squid and a haul of strange and unusual creatures netted from the deep. I asked the expedition's Principal Scientist, Alex Rogers from Oxford University's Department of Zoology, about the team's bumper catch and what these deep-sea animals can tell us about ocean ecosystems, biodiversity and mitigating man's impact on our oceans.

Health - Environment - 17.11.2010
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Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 17.11.2010
DNA study puts family history to the test
Scientists have developed a genetic test that reveals how diverse a person's ancestors were. Research conducted by the University of Edinburgh has shown that an individual's DNA records a historical archive of where they come from. The study has found that it is possible to determine whether a person's ancestors came from small, isolated communities, or from large, cosmopolitan populations.

Life Sciences - 17.11.2010
Brains, reading & stuttering
Brains, reading & stuttering
Science Pete Wilton | 17 Nov 10 January sees the release of The King's Speech , a movie in which Colin Firth stars as George VI, portraying the King's struggle to overcome his stutter. But how much do we understand about the processes that cause stuttering? Yesterday, Kate Watkins of Oxford University's Department of Experimental Psychology presented new research at the Neuroscience 2010 conference into the brain activity of people who stutter and how it differs from the brain activity of other people during reading and listening.

Health - Computer Science - 17.11.2010
Speech monitoring could track Parkinson s
Speech monitoring could track Parkinson s
Science | Health 17 Nov 10 The severity of Parkinson's disease symptoms could be accurately monitored remotely through analysing a patient's speech patterns, a new study suggests. The research, by scientists from Oxford University and Denver, Colorado, examined almost 6,000 speech recordings from 42 people with Parkinson's.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.11.2010
Cancer drug target is promising lead for new TB treatments
A key enzyme in Mycobacterium tuberculosis that enables the microbe to reproduce rapidly could be a golden target for new drugs against tuberculosis (TB), according to a study published in Microbiology on 17 November by scientists at the University of Birmingham. The human equivalent of this enzyme has been targeted in some cancer treatments as well as in immunosuppressive chemotherapies.

Physics - Chemistry - 16.11.2010
Scientists step closer to understanding secrets of anti-matter
Scientists step closer to understanding secrets of anti-matter
Liverpool, UK - 17 November 2010: Physicists at the Universities of Liverpool and Swansea have succeeded in trapping atoms of antihydrogen to help further understanding of the origins of the Universe. Researchers have trapped and held the atoms, the anti-matter counterpart of hydrogen, using an experiment called ALPHA at CERN in Switzerland.