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Pharmacology - Health - 07.06.2024
Study claiming antidepressant withdrawal is uncommon fails to account for long term users
Study claiming antidepressant withdrawal is uncommon fails to account for long term users
Comment: Study claiming antidepressant withdrawal is uncommon fails to account for long term users Writing in The Conversation, Professor Joanna Moncrieff and Dr Mark Horowitz (both UCL Psychiatry) respond to new research that antidepressant withdrawal is less common than previously thought by highlighting the risks among long-term users.

Psychology - 07.06.2024
Unravelling the gendered undertones of narcissism
Unravelling the gendered undertones of narcissism
Narcissistic tendencies are heavily shaped by our upbringing and are significant contributors to violence and bullying in adult relationships - but the causes and outcomes are different for men and women. New research from the University of Southampton and City, University of London has uncovered significant gender differences in narcissism and its influence on partner violence and bullying behaviour.

Materials Science - Physics - 07.06.2024
Researchers engineer new approach for controlling thermal emission
The University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute has spearheaded an international team to engineer a novel approach for controlling thermal emission, detailed in a paper published in Science . This breakthrough offers new design strategies beyond conventional materials, with promising implications for thermal management and camouflage technologies.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.06.2024
Major cause of inflammatory bowel disease discovered
UK researchers have discovered a new biological pathway which drives inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and could be targeted with existing drugs. The work, carried out by researchers at the Francis Crick Institute, working with UCL and Imperial College London, uncovered a region of DNA which effectively dials up the activity of specific white blood cells, driving inflammation and increasing IBD risk.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Increasing the levels of a key protein in the cells at the back of the eye could help protect against the leading cause of vision loss among older adults, finds a new study co-led by a UCL researcher. The findings from an international team based in the UK, US, Germany and Australia are published in Science Translational Medicine .

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
PhD candidate Ben Williams (UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research and ZSL's Institute of Zoology) writes with a colleague about why they built SurfPerch, an AI led system to make it faster and easier for marine scientists to answer ecological questions. Coral reefs cover only 0.1% of the ocean's surface - yet they host 25% of all known marine species.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.06.2024
Major cause of inflammatory bowel disease discovered
Major cause of inflammatory bowel disease discovered
A new biological pathway that is a principal driver of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and related conditions, and which can be targeted using existing drugs, has been discovered by researchers at UCL, the Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College London. About 5% of the world's population, and one in ten people in the UK, are currently affected by an autoimmune disease, such as IBD, the umbrella term for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause swelling and irritation of the digestive tract.

Astronomy / Space - 06.06.2024
Earliest detection of metal challenges what we know about the first galaxies
Earliest detection of metal challenges what we know about the first galaxies
Astronomers have detected carbon in a galaxy just 350 million years after the Big Bang, the earliest detection of any element in the universe other than hydrogen. Using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), an international team of astronomers led by the University of Cambridge observed a very young galaxy in the early universe and found that it contained surprising amounts of carbon, one of the seeds of life as we know it.

Health - 06.06.2024
Breakthrough research highlights Imperial’s strength in cardiovascular science
Three Imperial-led conference presentations have highlighted the university as a leader in cutting-edge cardiovascular disease research. New research from scientists at Imperial College London could help to advance treatment and care for patients with heart conditions. The work, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), covers areas including the use of artificial intelligence to diagnose heart attacks, remote monitoring of high-risk patients, and highlighting increased heart disease risk for British South Asians.

Career - 06.06.2024
Report proposes new rights to protect workers from 'unfair, unaccountable and uncaring' algorithms
Report proposes new rights to protect workers from ’unfair, unaccountable and uncaring’ algorithms
A report published today [6 June] calls for a new generation of rights to protect workers from the rise of 'management by algorithm'. The report published by the Institute of Employment Rights says that algorithmic management threatens to degrade workers' rights and conditions and that current protections in the law are inadequate in the face of technological change.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Training cognitive control in children does not change brain or behaviour
Training exercises designed to improve cognitive control in children do not make a significant difference to their ability to delay gratification or to their academic achievement, nor do they lead to any brain changes, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The findings, published in Nature Neuroscience , appear to debunk the popular idea that brain training could improve cognitive control - the mental processes that allow us to set and pursue shortor long-term goals - and thereby lead to tangible benefits to other real-life outcomes.

Environment - 05.06.2024
Electrified charcoal 'sponge' can soak up CO2 directly from the air
Electrified charcoal ’sponge’ can soak up CO2 directly from the air
Researchers have developed a low-cost, energy-efficient method for making materials that can capture carbon dioxide directly from the air. The first and most urgent thing we've got to do is reduce carbon emissions worldwide, but greenhouse gas removal is also thought to be necessary to achieve net zero emissions and limit the worst effects of climate change.

Psychology - Health - 05.06.2024
Internet addiction affects the behaviour and development of adolescents
Internet addiction affects the behaviour and development of adolescents
Adolescents with an internet addiction undergo changes in the brain that could lead to additional addictive behaviour and tendencies, finds a new study by UCL researchers. The findings, published in PLOS Mental Health , reviewed 12 articles involving 237 young people aged 10-19 with a formal diagnosis of internet addiction between 2013 and 2023.

Sport - Health - 05.06.2024
Women’s mental agility is better when they’re on their period
Participants reacted quicker and made fewer errors during menstruation, despite believing their performance would be worse, according to new research from UCL and the Institute of Sport, Exercise & Health (ISEH). The study, published in Neuropsychologia , is the first to assess sport-related cognition during the menstrual cycle and is part of a larger research project supported by the FIFA Research Scholarship.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
'Missing' sea sponges discovered
’Missing’ sea sponges discovered
The discovery, published in Nature, opens a new window on early animal evolution. At first glance, the simple, spikey sea sponge is no creature of mystery. No brain. No gut. No problem dating them back 700 million years. Yet convincing sponge fossils only go back about 540 million years, leaving a 160-million-year gap in the fossil record.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 05.06.2024
Scientists detect slowest-spinning radio emitting neutron star ever recorded
Artist's depiction of CSIRO's ASKAP radio telescope with two versions of the mysterious celestial object: neutron star or white dwarf Most collapsed stars rotate faster than once per second. This one takes nearly an hour. Scientists have detected what they believe to be a neutron star spinning at an unprecedentedly slow rate -slower than any of the more than 3,000 radio emitting neutron stars measured to date.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.06.2024
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviours in offspring from obese mice
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviours in offspring from obese mice
Maternal obesity in pregnancy changes the eating behaviours of offspring by increasing long-term levels of particular molecules known as microRNAs in the part of the brain that controls appetite - but this can be changed by exercise during pregnancy, a study in obese mice has suggested.

Health - 05.06.2024
Unpaid care disproportionately affects low-income households across Europe
Unpaid care has a huge impact on mental health and is more likely to be provided by people from low-income households, finds a landmark Europe-wide study by researchers at UCL and St George's, University of London. The Eurocare research was supported by UK charity Carers Trust and research teams in Spain, Norway and Germany.

Health - 05.06.2024
No evidence sperm counts are dropping, researchers find
The widely held view that sperm counts in men are dropping around the world may be wrong, according to a new study by University of Manchester, Queen's University in Kingston, Canada and Cryos International, Denmark. Using data from 6,758 men from four cities in Denmark applying to be sperm donors at the world's largest sperm bank, Cryos International, the study is published in the journal Human Reproduction today (05/06/24).

Health - Life Sciences - 04.06.2024
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviors in offspring from obese mice
Exercising during pregnancy normalises eating behaviors in offspring from obese mice
Maternal obesity in pregnancy changes the eating behaviors of offspring by increasing long-term levels of particular molecules known as microRNAs in the part of the brain that controls appetite - but this can be changed by exercise during pregnancy, a study in obese mice has suggested.