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Health - Materials Science - 24.01.2024
New Wearable Sensor Accurately Tracks Tiny Changes in the Breath Process
"Our sensor is like a highly accurate microphone for your breath. It can pick up on the tiniest changes in airflow, providing valuable physiological information on an individual, for example related to their cardiac, neurological and pulmonary conditions as well as certain types of illness. " Manchester scientists have developed a new type of wearable sensor that can precisely track your breath, even the slightest changes in the exhaling and inhaling processes.

Agronomy / Food Science - 24.01.2024
Mechanics behind root vegetable ageing
Mechanics behind root vegetable ageing
Undergraduate research conducted in a kitchen during lockdown could reduce food waste and help keep veg in prime condition for longer Published on Wednesday 24 January 2024 Last updated on Wednesday 24 January 2024 Chopped carrot pieces are among the most universally enjoyed foods and a snacking staple - a mainstay of school lunchboxes, picnics and party platters year-round.

Health - Veterinary - 24.01.2024
New research highlights surprisingly good health characteristics in Shih Tzu dogs in the UK
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has found the most common conditions diagnosed in Shih Tzu dogs in the UK are periodontal disease (inflammation of the gums and tissue around the teeth), anal sac impaction and ear disorders. While the findings suggest that the breed is predisposed to a number of conditions, the overall disorder profile of the Shih Tzu is surprisingly different and better than many other common flat-faced breeds.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.01.2024
Financial stress linked to worse biological health
Financial stress linked to worse biological health
People who experience stressful life events or circumstances are more likely to have worse biological health, as indicated by biomarkers involved in the interaction between our immune, nervous and endocrine systems, according to a new study by UCL researchers. The study, published in the journal Brain, Behavior and Immunity , found that not only major stressful experiences such as bereavement but chronic challenges such as financial strain were detrimental to the healthy interaction of these systems.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2024
Colours fade as people age
Colours fade as people age
There is a difference between how the brains of healthy older adults perceive colour compared to younger adults, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The research, published in Scientific Reports , compared how the pupils of younger and older people reacted to different aspects of colour in the environment.

Computer Science - 22.01.2024
New way to counter mobile phone 'account takeover' attacks
New way to counter mobile phone ’account takeover’ attacks
To understand and prevent these attacks, researchers had to get into the mind of the hacker, who builds a complex attack by combining smaller tactical steps. Computer science researchers have developed a new way to identify security weaknesses that leave people vulnerable to account takeover attacks, where a hacker gains unauthorized access to online accounts.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.01.2024
Widening inequalities are fuelling childhood obesity
New research shows how widening inequalities are fuelling childhood obesity Childhood obesity has increased the most in less advantaged groups, according to a new study Childhood obesity has increased the most in less advantaged groups, according to a new study. The research - led by the University of Glasgow and published in Archives of Disease in Childhood - found that despite a plateau in overall childhood obesity since 2004, widening societal inequalities meant the increased prevalence of overweight and obesity was seen primarily in socioeconomically disadvantaged children.

Veterinary - Health - 22.01.2024
High levels of problem behaviours and use of aversive training methods in pandemic puppies
The pawfect storm: study finds high levels of problem behaviours and use of aversive training methods in pandemic puppies The average number of owner-reported problem behaviours among 'pandemic puppies' was five, with problem behaviours more likely in owners using aversive training techniques, says the Royal Veterinary College Four in five (82%) 'pandemic puppy' owners have reported using aversive training methods in attempts to address their dog's problem behaviours, according to a new study by the Royal Veterinary College (RVC).

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 18.01.2024
Lightest black hole or heaviest neutron star? Manchester astronomers uncover a mysterious object in Milky Way
An artist's impression of the system assuming that the massive companion star is a black hole. The brightest background star is its orbital companion, the radio pulsar PSR J0514-4002E. The two stars are separated by 8 million km and circle each other every 7 days. An international team of astronomers have found a new and unknown object in the Milky Way that is heavier than the heaviest neutron stars known and yet simultaneously lighter than the lightest black holes known.

Health - Economics - 18.01.2024
Removing largest wine glass serving reduces amount of wine sold in bars and pubs
Removing largest wine glass serving reduces amount of wine sold in bars and pubs
Taking away the largest serving of wine by the glass - in most cases the 250ml option - led to an average reduction in the amount of wine sold at pubs and bars of just under 8%, new research led by a team at the University of Cambridge has discovered. When the largest serving size of wine by the glass was unavailable, people shifted towards the smaller options, but didn't then drink the equivalent amount of wine Eleni Mantzari While only modest, the finding could provide one way of nudging customers to drink less alcohol and have an impact at a population level, say the researchers.

Astronomy / Space - 18.01.2024
Galaxy mergers solve early Universe mystery
Galaxy mergers solve early Universe mystery
A team of astronomers, led by the University of Cambridge, has used the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope to reveal, for the first time, what lies in the local environment of galaxies in the very early Universe. This has solved one of the most puzzling mysteries in astronomy - why astronomers detect light from hydrogen atoms that should have been entirely blocked by the pristine gas that formed after the Big Bang.

Life Sciences - 18.01.2024
Research uncovers mechanism behind stubborn memories
Researchers from the Medical Research Council Brain Network Dynamics Unit at the University of Oxford and the Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences have identified a novel mechanism by which the brain produces powerful lasting memories that drive ill-advised actions. Focussing on cocaine experience, the researchers demonstrate how the collective activity of many nerve cells distributed across the brain underlies the persistence of such memories, providing new insights into why drug-seeking behaviours could lead to addiction.

Health - Veterinary - 18.01.2024
New research highlights high risk of ear and eye disease in English Cocker Spaniels in the UK
New research highlights high risk of ear and eye disease in English Cocker Spaniels in the UK
New research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) VetCompass? programme has found that English Cockers Spaniels have an increased risk of disorders such as ear discharge, dry eye and musculoskeletal pain, but have reduced risk of allergies, alopecia (hair loss) and osteoarthritis. This research will help vets, breeders and dog owners to predict what problems English Cocker Spaniels might develop, better monitor their health and promote earlier diagnosis.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.01.2024
'Mini-placentas' help scientists understand the causes of pre-eclampsia and pregnancy disorders
’Mini-placentas’ help scientists understand the causes of pre-eclampsia and pregnancy disorders
Scientists have grown 'mini-placentas' in the lab and used them to shed light on how the placenta develops and interacts with the inner lining of the womb - findings that could help scientists better understand and, in future, potentially treat pre-eclampsia. Most of the major disorders of pregnancy - pre-eclampsia, still birth, growth restriction, for example - depend on failings in the way the placenta develops in the first few weeks.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 17.01.2024
Astronomers detect oldest black hole ever observed
Astronomers detect oldest black hole ever observed
Researchers have discovered the oldest black hole ever observed, dating from the dawn of the universe, and found that it is 'eating' its host galaxy to death. It's a new era: the giant leap in sensitivity, especially in the infrared, is like upgrading from Galileo's telescope to a modern telescope overnight Roberto Maiolino The international team, led by the University of Cambridge, used the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to detect the black hole, which dates from 400 million years after the big bang, more than 13 billion years ago.

Astronomy / Space - 17.01.2024
Citizen scientists needed to discover elusive black holes
Citizen scientists needed to discover elusive black holes
Could you help our scientists uncover the mysterious world of invisible black holes? Become a Black Hole Hunter and you'll be taking part in scientific research that has the potential to reveal more about one of space's most intriguing aspects. All you will need is a smartphone, tablet or other computer, some guidance on how to spot the tell-tale clues, and a bit of time.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.01.2024
Role of inherited genetic variants in rare blood cancer uncovered
Role of inherited genetic variants in rare blood cancer uncovered
Combining three different sources of genetic information has allowed researchers to further understand why only some people with a common mutation go on to develop rare blood cancer Our hope is that this information can be incorporated into future disease prediction efforts Jyoti Nangalia Large-scale genetic analysis has helped researchers uncover the interplay between cancer-driving genetic mutations and inherited genetic variants in a rare type of blood cancer.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 17.01.2024
New image of supermassive M87* black hole one year on
New image of supermassive M87* black hole one year on
The global Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration involving UCL researcher Dr Ziri Younsi has released new images of M87*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of the galaxy Messier 87. The new images are from observations taken in April 2018, one year after the first observations of M87* in April 2017 which resulted in the first ever image of a black hole.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 17.01.2024
Climate and health impacts of dust inaccurately represented
The source and amounts of different types of mineral dust reaching the Earth's atmosphere needs to be re-evaluated so its effects on human health and climate change can be more accurately understood, scientists claim. The international team, led by Cardiff University, says existing models have over-estimated the role of North Africa as the primary source of global dust emissions for nearly thirty years leading to inaccuracies in our understanding of the impacts on rainforests, oceans and ice.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.01.2024
Machine learning predicts response to drug for arthritis in children
Doctors might one day be able to target children and young people with arthritis most likely to be helped by its first-line treatment, thanks to the application of machine learning by University of Manchester scientists. Though methotrexate is the first-line drug to be given for Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), it is only effective or tolerated in half of the children and young people who receive it.