History / Philosophy

Earth Sciences - History - Sep 28
Earth Sciences - History
Researchers have shown that over the past two thousand years, volcanoes have played a larger role in natural temperature variability than previously thought, and their climatic effects may have contributed to past societal and economic change. Some climate models assume that the effect of volcanoes is punctuated and short.
History - Materials Science - Sep 23

Chromium steel - similar to what we know today as tool steel - was first made in Persia, nearly a millennium earlier than experts previously thought, according to a new study led by UCL. The discovery, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science , was made with the aid of a number of medieval Persian manuscripts, which led the researchers to an archaeological site in Chahak, southern Iran.

Social Sciences - History - Sep 1
Social Sciences - History

Using radiocarbon dating and CT scanning to study ancient bones, researchers have uncovered for the first time a Bronze Age tradition of retaining and curating human remains as relics over several generations.

History - Aug 14

A team from our Archaeology Department have been helping to uncover the past of a rare Viking artefact. The origins of a corroded, damaged helmet, which was unearthed in Yarm, Stockton-on-Tees, UK, has caused much debate for many years and Dr Chris Caple and his team were asked to carry out research to find out more about it.

Life Sciences - History - Sep 16
Life Sciences - History

Invaders, pirates, warriors - the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond.

History - Chemistry - Aug 27
History - Chemistry

Analysing three components of ceramic cooking pots - charred remains, inner surface residues and lipids absorbed within the ceramic walls - may help archaeologists uncover detailed timelines of culinary cooking practices used by ancient civilisations.

History - Earth Sciences - Aug 12
History - Earth Sciences

Radiocarbon dating, a technique widely used in archaeology and geoscience, is set to become more accurate than ever after an international team of scientists have shared much-anticipated new calibration curves based on data from ancient trees, lake and ocean sediments, cave deposits and more.


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