Manchester academics selected in Top 50 Women in Engineering

Two University of Manchester engineers, Professors Caroline Jay and Aline Miller, have been honoured with inclusion in the Top 50 Women in Engineering (WE50) for their stellar contributions and impact in engineering.

The International Women in Engineering Day takes place today, 23 June and continues to lead the way to provide female engineers with a voice heard around the world.

With 16.5% of engineers now being women, the annual INWED event provides female engineers with an opportunity to shine in an industry where they are underrepresented. This one-of-a-kind event plays a pivotal role in not just showcasing talent but also in encouraging and inspiring the next generation of female engineers.

Now in its seventh year, the 2022 WE50 winners celebrate women who are older than 18 who can demonstrate the creation or improvement of a product or process that makes a difference.

For 2022, the Women’s Engineering Society, in association with The Guardian and Ball Corporation, a global supplier of sustainable packaging, invited nominations on numerous factors, including their ability to support and combat climate change, work as an advocate for women in STEM, their drive to make a difference within the engineering industry and achieving beyond what would normally be expected.

Once again WES is delighted to celebrate the achievements of women engineers. It’s a joy that so many innovative women are making a difference to our everyday lives and working to mitigate the impact that engineering has on the environment.

Professor Caroline Jay has been recognised for her research into finding an easier way to monitor a symptomless heart condition which could save thousands of lives each year. "It’s a great privilege to be named as one of the top 50 Women in Engineering 2022." she said.

"As Head of Research in the School of Engineering I believe it’s vital that we celebrate the work of female engineers, and I’m delighted that Aline Miller has also been recognised for work founding Manchester Biogel, and as Associate Dean for Innovation and Business Engagement in the Faculty of Science and Engineering."

Professor Jay and her team have created an algorithm that can more easily detect the condition, known as long QT syndrome, which can cause fast, chaotic heartbeats and can be life threatening.

Professor Aline Miller’s research interests lie at the life-science interface with emphasis on applying physical principles to mimic, manipulate and improve molecular self-assembly for material design and application.

"I am thrilled and humbled to be sat alongside the inspiring women who are also featured in the top 50 Women in Engineering 2022." said Professor Miller.

"International Women in Engineering Day is a day to celebrate the many contributions of women working within our discipline, but we should also pause and remember how much more there is to do to reach true equality within the workforce and in innovation."

Working with academics and industry Aline’s team work to translate hydrogel materials to improve the quality of our lives and reduce costs and time involved to achieve a successful clinical outcome. Application areas currently showing promise in animal studies include the regeneration of heart tissue after heart attack, peripheral nerve repair and the targeted delivery of therapeutics for the treatment of endometriosis.

As Elizabeth Donnelly CEO of WES says: "Once again WES is delighted to celebrate the achievements of women engineers. It’s a joy that so many innovative women are making a difference to our everyday lives and working to mitigate the impact that engineering has on the environment".


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